Our Legacy: Many Voices, Many Stories

  • May 10, 2024 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
  • Bus Stop Theatre Co-op

    2203 Gottingen Street
    Halifax, Nova Scotia B3K 3B5
Ticket Price (CAD) $2.00-$40.00 This event is now over
Description

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An evening of stories, songs and celebration!

Our Legacy: Many Voices, Many Stories is a tribute and celebration of Black families, stories and songs. The Black family has been through 400 years of existence in Nova Scotia and continues to be the backbone of African Nova Scotian communities. We stand on their shoulders and despite the racism, segregation and discrimination our families continue to stand strong and determined.

We are because of them!

Join Shelley Fashan and her curated lineup of guests as they share their voices and stories spanning generations.

Shelley has a lengthy history of community involvement, activism and volunteerism. She has served on the East Coast Music  Association, the Nova Scotia Arts Council, which was responsible for creating the Portia White Prize. the Lieutenant Governor Masterworks Award and a founding member of the Nova Scotia Mass Choir and the African Nova Scotian Music Association. She  currently sits on the boards of the Charles Taylor Theatre and Media Arts Association, the Eastern Shore Cooperator and The Descendants of African Americans Living in Nova Scotia, the Akoma Property Commitee and the Advisory Council of the Road to  Economic Prosperity.

Shelley is a cultural producer who has produced several Singer/Songwriter Circles of local  artists, including a tribute to African Nova Scotian Roots Artists, “Four The Moment” and most recently in May 2019, she produced a  most successful evening called “ Sistas In the Struggle Black Feminist Panel and the How We Won Tribute and showcase in honour  of the longest running occupation and protest in Canada on Gottingen Street.

Florence Mae West

Florence Mae West is a direct descendant of Africville. She is the daughter of Frederick West, the son of Former Africville Resident Lena May West. Many considered her Nanny to be “The Spirit of Africville” because of her legacy of Old Negro Spirituals she shared each Sunday at Seaview Baptist Church, many of which Florence learned at her feet as a child during family Spiritual times in the living room. Florence grew up watching her Nanny, and her daughters “The West Sisters” share this rich legacy of Old Negro Spirituals in many venues. Today, Florence is grateful to God to be able to carry on this legacy.

Linda Carvery

Former President of the award-winning Nova Scotia Mass Choir, Linda embarked on a solo career, recording her first CD Yesterday/Today.

Linda has expanded her musical horizons by performing in the Neptune Theatre productions of the musicals Gospel at Colonus and Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. She also performed in Eastern Front Theatre’s production of Whylah Falls which staged a series of performances at the National Arts Centre.

Linda has created and performed in one-woman shows. First came Make That Gospel, Double Double for Halifax Fringe Festival, followed by Soulful Sunday Sounds of Africville.

Recently Watch Over Me was mounted by Mulgrave Road Theatre. As well, Linda was the vocalist in George Elliott Clarke’s production 5 Poets Breaking Into Song.

The Fraser Family

Raised in the Baptist Faith in the Black Community of North Preston the Fraser Family has been singing gospel for over 4 generations. The family first started singing Country style Gospel music with their parents Cyril and Rosella Fraser as part of the family singing tradition that exists within the Preston area and throughout Black communities in Nova Scotia. The Fraser family has kept the tradition alive as they are invited to Churches, Community concerts, and festivals within Metro area.

The Thomas Family

Dr. Carolyn G. Thomas is a Multi-generational, Lifelong resident of East Preston, Nova Scotia, Canada. Carolyn is a Mother of 4 and Grandmother to 2 grandchildren. She is internationally recognized as an acclaimed, historian, lecturer, Civil Rights Advocate/Activist, and author of  the Underground Railroad to Nova Scotia. Carolyn was a founding member of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission who  dedicated 2 and a half decades to making Nova Scotia a more diverse and inclusive province. Her life’s work has centered around championing the cause for justice, economic and community development throughout her church, community and beyond.

Trynda Thomas is a multi-generational, Black Nova Scotian from East Preston, Nova Scotia, Canada. She is the youngest daughter of  the late Deacon Matthew Thomas and Dr. Carolyn G. Thomas, and the proud mother of daughter, Wilhelmina. Trynda is an alumnus of Dalhousie University where she obtained her Bachelor’s degree. She also studied at Dalhousie School of Law – believing in Justice  and equality for all. Trynda loves to sing and has performed on many ova Scotia stages, across Canada and internationally.  She has worked in the field of HR for over 20 years both nationally and internationally. She is the Founder of Talent Scouts International, a professional staffing agency and HR Consultancy.

Tamara Thomas is a multi-generational, Black Nova Scotian from East Preston, Nova Scotia, Canada. She is the middle daughter of  the late Deacon Matthew Thomas and Dr. Carolyn G. Thomas. Tamara is passionate about helping families and bringing out the best  in people and serves as a Parenting Journey Professional. She is very active in her church and community having served on many  boards and committees at large. Tamara sings lead in her church choir, is a Member of the Nova Scotia Mass Choir and has traveled  nationally and internationally sharing her gift of song.

Date & Time

Fri., May 10, 2024 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Venue Details

Bus Stop Theatre Co-op

2203 Gottingen Street
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3K 3B5 Bus Stop Theatre Co-op
Mayworks Kjipuktuk/Halifax

May 1st is marked throughout the world as International Workers’ Day, or May Day. A day when the workers of the world take to the streets (when not facing a pandemic) in every major city around the globe demanding justice, fairness and dignity for all. In North America, May Day has not been as prominent as it is in other parts of the world, but it is still celebrated in most major cities with a variety of political and community actions.  However, May Day isn’t simply a celebration of labour. It is a rallying call against our current economic system, a public declaration that “Capitalism Isn’t Working For Workers,” and an affirmation that a better world is possible.

One of the ways various labour councils and unions mark May Day is through the Mayworks Festival. Mayworks was originally conceived in 1986 by the Toronto and York District Labour Council and the idea has since spread to many cities across the country. The goal behind Mayworks is to bring workers and artists together and to use art to explore themes of justice, solidarity and liberation. Art has always been an important way of expressing political statements and Mayworks continues a long tradition of building bonds of solidarity between artists and labour organizations.

The first annual Mayworks Halifax festival took place in 2009 thanks to the organizing efforts of the Halifax-Dartmouth & District Labour Council. Our festival has since grown exponentially from year to year and has now become Nova Scotia’s largest social justice-themed cultural event. Annually, our festival attracts over a thousand diverse audience members who take interest in issues of social, economic and environmental justice.